Island Arc Award

The Geological Society of Japan Island Arc Award

(Sponsored by Wiley)
The Geological Society of Japan Island Arc Award is presented to the author(s) of excellent papers published in the journal “Island Arc” that have made significant, internationally recognized contributions in geology. The award is presented to all co-authors regardless of the membership of the Society.

2016 Shinji Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Komiya, Hiroshi Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki Kaneko, Masaru Terabayashi, Ikuo Katayama, Tsuyoshi Iizuka, Shigenori Maruyama, Jingsui Yang, Yoshiaki Kon and Takafumi Hirata,2013,Recycled crustal zircons from podiform chromitites in the Luobusa ophiolite, southern Tibet.Island Arc, 22, 89-103.
2015 Arai, S., Okamura, H., Kadoshima,K., Tanaka, C., Suzuki, K. and Ishimaru, S., 2011, Chemical characteristics of chromian spinel in plutonic rocks : Implications for deep magma processes and discrimination of tectonic setting. Island Arc, 20, 125-137.
2014 Dapeng Zhao, M. Santosh and Akira Yamada, 2010. Dissecting large earthquakes in Japan: Role of arc magma and fluids. Island Arc, 19, 4–16
2013 Keiko Hattori, Simon Wallis, Masaki Enami, Tomoyuki Mizukami, 2010, Subduction of mantle wedge peridotites: Evidence from the Higashi-akaishi ultramafic body in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt. Island Arc, 19, 192-207.
2012 Barber, A. J. and Crow, M. J., 2009.Structure of Sumatra and its implications for the tectonic assembly of Southeast Asia and the destruction of Paleotethys.Island Arc, 18, 3-20.
2011 Saffer, D. M., Underwood, M. B. and McKiernan, A. W., 2008, Evaluation of factors controlling smectite transformation and fluid production in subduction zones: Application to the Nankai Trough. Island Arc, 17, 208-230.
2010 Fu-Yuan Wu, Jin-Hui Yang, Ching-Hua Lo, Simon A. Wilde, De-You Sun and Bor-Ming Jahn, 2007, The Heilongjiang Group: A Jurassic accretionary complex in the Jiamusi Massif at the western Pacific margin of northeastern China. Island Arc, 16, 156-172.
2009 Bortolotti, V. and Principi, G.,2005,Tethyan ophiolites and Pangea break-up. Island Arc, 14, 442-470.
2008 Chang Whan Oh, Sung Won Kim, In-Chang Ryu, Toshinori Okada, Hironobu Hyodo and Tetsumaru Itaya, 2004, Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Okcheon Metamorphic Belt, South Korea: Tectonic implications in East Asia. Island Arc, 13, 387-402.
2007 Graciano P. Yumul Jr., Carla B. Dimalanta, Rodolfo A. Tamayo Jr. and Rene C. Maury,2003,Collision, subduction and accretion events in the Philippines: A synthesis. Island Arc, 12, 77-91.

2013:

Awarded paper: Hattori Keiko, Wallis Simon, Enami Masaki and Mizukami Tomoyuki, 2010. Subduction of mantle wedge peridotites: Evidence from the Higashi-akaishi ultramaficbody in the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt. Island Arc, 19, 192-207.

The Higashi-akaishi ultramafic body is the largest garnet-bearing peridotites in the SambagawaMetamorphic Belt. Through mineral chemistry of coexisting phases and coupled thermobarometriccomputations, the authors have clearly and unambiguously documented the hanging-wall, i.e.,mantle wedge origin of the Higashi-akaishi peridotite; they have further chronicled its subsequenttectonic decoupling from the stable overlying plate and descent attending high-pressurerecrystallization along the subduction channel in traction with the downgoing paleo-Pacific oceanic lithosphere. This paper provides a good constraint to consider the genesis of the Sambagawametamorphic belt and an important insight into the not-well understood melting and tectonicprocesses in the wedge mantle, for which the article is highly evaluated. It will benefit not only theHP-UHP metamorphic petrologists but also a much broader scientific community involved insubduction zone research. The paper received one of the highest number of citations− based on the Thomson Science Indexfor the year 2012− amongst the entire candidate Island Arc papers published in 2010. The firstauthor has been active in the research of the behaviour of redox-sensitive metals and volatiles in avariety of settings such as subduction zones and the Archean Canadian shield, for more than 35 years. This paper adds to her many contributions and is a worthy recipient of the 2012 Island Arc award.

2012:

Awarded paper: Barber, A. J. and Crow, M. J., 2009.Structure of Sumatra and its implications for the tectonic assembly of Southeast Asia and the destruction of Paleotethys.Island Arc, 18, 3-20.

Barber and Crow use their extensive knowledge of a wide range of geological information to address the complex paleogeography of the SE Asian region with special focus on Sumatra and its three constituent continental blocks: the East Malay, Sibumasu and West Sumatra blocks. In this paper the authors argue for a Mid Permian to Upper Triassic collision between the Sibumasu and East Malay blocks in Sumatra and discuss the possibility of later amalgamation further to the north. They also revise previous estimates for the age of the main transcurrent movements between the Sibumasu and West Sumatra blocks suggesting these were largely complete by Mid Triassic. These workers also suggest the West Sumatra Block may be correlated with the West Burma block to the north and present an interpretation of the Woyla block as an intraoceanic arc.These ideas are presented using a series of clear diagrams. The ideas presented in this paper are likely to stimulate further discussion and lead to a better understanding of the paleogeography of this region. The first author has been active in the research of eastern Asia including Japan, for more than 30 years.
This paper adds his many contributions and is a worthy recipient for the 2012 Island Arc award.

2011:

Awarded paper: Saffer, D. M., Underwood, M. B. and McKiernan, A. W., 2008, Evaluation of factors controlling smectite transformation and fluid production in subduction zones: Application to the Nankai Trough. Island Arc, 17, 208-230.

Combining ODP data on the Nankai sedimentary package with kinetic studies involving the reaction of smectite to illite, the authors have established numerical models simulating the clay minerals’ reaction both outboard of the deep-sea trench and beneath the convergent plate junction, thereby enhancing a quantitative understanding of accretionary processes and seismicity. Heat flow (or crustal age) has the largest effect on the transformation. They showed that the eastern high heat flow slab segment initiates the transformation before arriving at the trench, whereas the western low heat flow slab segment results in negligible presubduction diagenesis and that plate convergence rate has the smallest effect on the transformation. This provides the most credible view of how clay diagenesis modulates hydrologic and mechanical behavior of the subduction boundaries. These are important information on mechanical property of the seismogenic zone as well as diagenesis and fluid circulation in the accretionary wedge.
This paper received the highest number of citations – based on the Thomson Science Index for the year 2010 – amongst the entire candidate Island Arc papers published in 2007-2008. The first author has been working in the fields of the geohydrology, active tectonics, fault mechanics, and structural geology, focusing on quantifying the relationships between fluid flow, deformation, solute transport, and heat transport in subduction zones and transform fault systems like the San Andreas Fault. He and his group have published many important results on these fields. In view of the scientific impact of the paper and international scientific activity of the first author, the Judge Panel recommends this paper for the 2011 Island Arc Award.

2010:

Awarded paper: Fu-Yuan Wu, Jin-Hui Yang, Ching-Hua Lo, Simon A. Wilde, De-You Sun and Bor-Ming Jahn, 2007, The Heilongjiang Group: A Jurassic accretionary complex in the Jiamusi Massif at the western Pacific margin of northeastern China. Island Arc, 16, 156-172.

This paper paid attention to the Heilongjiang complex in the western margin of the Jiamusi Massif, NE China, to understand the tectonic setting of the eastern Asian continental margin in the Jurassic. It provides geological and chronological data of metamorphic rocks from the complex, showing that the Heilongjiang complex is a tectonic mélange of an Early Jurassic accretionary complex. The authors propose a new idea that a continental margin existed at least since the Early Jurassic along the eastern Asian continental margin and was affected by the Late Jurassic to the Cretaceous subduction and accretionary processes. This paper has been stimulating recent researches on tectonic re-interpretation of the continental blocks and accretionary complexes in eastern Asia. It will also make great contribution to future researches on geodynamic evolution of the eastern Asian continental margin.
This paper received the highest number of citations – based on the Thomson Science Index for the year 2008 – amongst all the candidate Island Arc papers published in 2006-2007. The first author has been engaged in geological and chronological studies of eastern Asia for many years and published many other important papers on Asian geology in international journals. In view of the scientific impact of the paper and international scientific activity of the first author, the Judge Panel recommends this paper for the 2010 Island Arc Award.

2009:

Awarded paper: Bortolotti, V. and Principi, G.,2005,Tethyan ophiolites and Pangea break-up
Island Arc, 14, 442-470.

This paper provides a masterful tectonic-petrologic-geochemical synthesis of the rifting and dispersion of Pangea based on the newly generated Tethyan oceanic crust now preserved in the Alpine mountain belts. It compiles Triassic to middle Jurassic ophiolitic bodies in the Tethyan and Caribbean regions in detail and proposes that the breakup of Pangea and the development of the Tethyan ophiolites progressed from east (Middle-Late Triassic) to west (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous). It presents the role of ophiolites in the elucidation of the timing and mechanisms of the breakup of Pangea as well as the development of Tethyan basins throughout the Mesozoic.
Based on the Thomson Science Index for the year 2007, this paper had the greatest number of citations of the candidate Island Arc papers published in 2005-2006. The first author has long worked in the fields of regional geology and geodynamics of the Northern Apennines and the peri-Mediterranean chains. He has energetically studied the stratigraphy, tectonics, and geodynamic evolution of the internal areas of these orogenic chains, in particular the successions pertaining to the Tethyan Ocean. He has published many articles on regional geology concerning the ophiolitic successions from Cyprus, the Pontic Ranges, Hellenides, Albanides, Dinarides, Romanian Apuseni, and Northern Apennines and has made great contributions in this field. We believe that this paper will contribute to future research on the geologic and geodynamic evolution of the Eurasia-Pacific region. In view of the scientific impact of the paper and the international scientific activity of the first author, the Judge Panel recommends this paper for the 2009 Island Arc Award.